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Walk Around Burniston

A couple consult a map during a walk in the sunshine. Distance: 1 mile (1.6km)

Shore Life:

This is not so much a walk as an amble. Burniston Bay has a rocky shore backed by gravel and boulder beaches and low cliffs. It is an excellent area to search for shore life or to look for attractive beach pebbles.

 

Check locally to ensure you choose a day when the tide is out and do not venture beyond the headlands at either end of the bay.

 

Start Finish: Crook Ness, Burniston (GR 026935) OS Map: Explorer OL 27
Bus Services: Regular service between Scarborough and Cloughton or Whitby. Alight at the Three Jolly Sailors and walk down Rocks Lane.
Car Parking: Small informal car park at the end of Rocks Lane
Toilets: None
Refreshments: Two public houses in Burniston
Visit: The Sea Life Centre, Scarborough
Runswick Bay. Robin Hoods Bay. Scalby Mills, Scarborough.

 

From the small car park A at the end of Rocks Lane a good path leads down to a rocky shore. This is Crook Ness in Burniston Bay. To the north is Long Nab, B to the south, Cromer Point.C
The rocky shore is very rugged and some of the rocks may be slippery, so take care. Formed in an ancient river delta over 170 million years ago these sandstones have since worn away to create crevices and gullies which are a haven for wildlife.

 

The tide takes about six hours to fall from high water to low water and the same time to return. Each day the time of high water will move forward about 40 minutes and the height it reaches will also vary.

 

When exploring the shore, keep a sharp look out for which way the tide is running and don’t get cut off on some higher area of rock. The plants of the shore, seaweeds, are nearly all very flexible and are anchored to the rocks to prevent them being washed or broken off at high water. To reduce drying out when exposed to the air while the tide is out, they produce a mucus which makes the seaweeds slippery. There are many different types of seaweed which are broadly grouped into three categories by colour. Generally speaking the green weeds grow near the upper shore, the browns on the middle and lower shore and the red weeds are only found in the deeper water.

 

There are hundreds of species of animal living on a rocky shore and literally millions of individuals. To protect themselves when the tide is out many hide away in nooks and crannies or deeper pools. Others, such as limpets clamp themselves firmly to the rock while barnacles close the top of their shells so tight they appear to be a solid shell.

 

Life is harsh on a rocky shore. Creatures have to be able to withstand the pounding of the waves and the drying effects of the sun, those in rock pools have to be able to cope with rising temperatures and increasing salinity, nearly all species are potential food for another. It’s a hard life  don’t make it harder by collecting creatures from the shore.

 

For further assistance please contact the Scarborough Tourism Bureau on 01723 383636.

Scarborough Borough Council website
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